How to choose a wedding videographer?

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Thanks to wedding videography, modern newlyweds can look back on a fantastic video documentary of their big day. These days, the wedding video is often the last thing on a couple's to-do list that includes the reception venue, flowers, cakes, decorations, invitations, and dress. Although it may seem like a minor detail, having a video made of your wedding is a great way to remember the big day forever.

If you want to keep track of everything that's happened in your life, you have a choice between two methods. You can capture all the happy and sad emotions, as well as special moments with your bridal party and best man, for future reflection through wedding photos and videos. In order to get the best shots for the wedding album, the photographer will need to pose the happy couple and their guests. The videographer, on the other hand, must act like a ninja by disappearing into the scenery while recording extra casual scenes.

A wedding video captures the joy and excitement of your special day like no still images ever could. Additionally, the quality of these videos has greatly increased over the years as digital technology has developed. Ten years ago, analogue (VHS) cameras were the norm, but today, most videographers use small, unobtrusive digital video cameras.

In addition, the video will likely be delivered to you in DVD format, which will provide superior picture quality and a shelf life of 100 years (as opposed to 15 years with a VHS tape). For what will your final video product be used? Here is a rundown of what you can expect, how to save money in the process, and where to look for help from the pros.

If you’re looking for the best Video Company in Melbourne then look no further. Check out Vines of the Yarra Valley’s ultimate list. 

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Table of Contents

Tips for Choosing Your Wedding Videographer

Hire friendly photographers and videographers. 

On the day of your wedding, there will be many moments that you will want to remember forever. Your photographer and videographer will capture all of the same priceless moments on film, including the bride and groom's first look, the ceremony, the toasts, the reception, and more. To ensure smooth running of the event, it's best to hire a photographer and videographer who have experience collaborating. That way, they can set up safeguards to guarantee that they always record the momentous occasions as they occur. For a stress-free wedding day, consult your wedding planner for suggestions or have your photographer recommend a videographer (or vice versa).

Find a filmmaker who is comfortable with your venue type.  

You've finally settled on a director, but you've realised that their work is exclusively set outside while your wedding will be held in a ballroom. Ask the videographer if they have experience shooting in a wedding setting before you commit to hiring them. Ask to see some of their previous work, and if possible, bring in a film that you particularly enjoyed that was shot in your venue or one like it to make sure they're used to working in a similar environment.

Find someone who matches your wedding video style preference.  

Watch a tonne of sample films after narrowing down your search to a handful of local filmmakers who are also within your budget. There's a wide range of styles among wedding movies. Some focus primarily on the bride and groom getting ready, while others feature extensive, unscripted footage of the reception's dancing and celebration. While some ceremonies only feature music, others also feature vows, speeches, and toasts.

In some cases, the bride and groom sit down for interviews, either on the big day or in advance. There should be a number of the videographer's previous works that you particularly enjoy watching. Send them some of your favourite works from their portfolio before the wedding. Describe in detail what it is about each example that appealed to you.

Don't be afraid to search beyond your city.  

It makes more sense to use a local florist or caterer if you're planning a wedding. To be sure, location shouldn't be a determining factor when picking a videographer. While it's true that filmmakers need some gear, it's usually not more than they can fit in a car or airplane. Although the travel policies of filmmakers vary, reaching out to someone you love who isn't local is always encouraged.

Understand what's included in your package.  

Popularity of wedding videography has led to a proliferation of related services and a corresponding expansion of related jargon. Knowing what you can expect from your shipment is the first step in avoiding disappointment when it arrives. Be sure that the amount and type of coverage provided in the samples your filmmaker sends you (Instagram teaser, trailer, full edit, etc.) is what you want before hiring them.

Be sure that you jive with the videographer.

Having a videographer on board means dancing with them from the time you sign the contract until months after the wedding, when the editing is complete. Be sure you're both tangoing to the same tune before signing anything.

It's quite an adventure to spend an entire day being filmed when you have no prior experience with it. The quality of the photo you end up with depends entirely on how well you get along with the photographer. More importantly, the level of chemistry between you and your videographer will determine how well your film turns out.

When you and your videographer have a good rapport, you can share personal details that will make your film stand out.

Meet up for drinks or coffee with a diverse group of people. To what extent do you feel that each of these describes your relationship? If anyone is asking pertinent questions, which one is it? Is there a particular character that you feel has the same humour as you?

Be sure you like the way their previous films tell stories.

A bride once said to me, "I have never seen one of your wedding videos that didn't make me cry." Receiving positive comments like that makes me feel like I'm really making a difference in the world. This is a story I'm telling.

Actually, most couples do have a story that could make grown men cry, but only if their storyteller (the videographer) takes the time to get to know them well enough before the wedding to find that story and tell it on purpose.

I recommend checking out the work of as many different videographers as possible to find a style you like. What makes them so distinctive? As opposed to another film, why did this one make you cry?

Make sure they have assistants to help split the tasks on your big day.

Used to shoot weddings by myself; would not recommend to worst enemy. For everything to go smoothly, there is simply too much equipment, too many moving parts, too little time, and too many locations to be in at once. Pick a person who will despatch two people on the day of the wedding.

Don't be afraid to budget for a videographer- a quality often depends upon what you pay.

Many future Mrs. choose to add video to their wedding as an extravagance if they have the funds. In that case, I wouldn't recommend buying a video at all, as you run the risk of spending money on something you don't like.

High-quality videos of weddings never on sale, even on Black Friday. Filmmaking is an art form that necessitates dedication, planning, effort, physical exertion, top-notch equipment, and plenty of time in post-production. Since costs vary so widely, I won't offer a specific estimate. However, you should set aside at least as much money as you intend to pay your photographer, and preferably more. You shouldn't rule someone out solely because of how much they'll cost you, but you should be wary of anyone trying to sell you an extremely cheap bundle.

Request demos

A demonstration tape is a great way to see the videographer's work before hiring them. If they say they can't show you a demonstration because of confidentiality or other concerns, you can move them out of your list.

In order to get the full effect of their work, you should watch a full video from beginning to end, but you should also see a variety of their work. You must have faith that they will report on every aspect of the event, not just the most noteworthy parts. Remember that this is a long video and a few hiccups are to be expected.

Looking into references from contented customers is yet another choice.

Looking for a Video Company in Melbourne? Check out our ultimate list of videographers here. 

Communication Skills

A good videographer is someone who gets along well with others and can express themselves clearly on camera. Making sure everyone is on the same page about the day's activities and what to expect from the video can be facilitated through clear and concise communication.

In order to do their jobs effectively, videographers must interact with both guests and other industry members. The videographer's or celebrant's professionalism may suffer if they have a disagreement.

Style

If you want to capture your special day on film, it's important to find a videographer whose style you enjoy. Typical examples of these styles include:

  • Documentary-style footage taken straight from a reality TV show
  • Interviews, narrated sections, etc., in a documentary format.
  • Expressionistic, cinematic tenors

Cost

Making a wedding video of high quality is a costly endeavour, which is why professionals have to charge so much. Don't trust ridiculously low price quotes.

Professional videography services will run you at least equal to hiring a photographer, though we can't give you a more precise estimate than that. When you consider that making a professional-quality video usually necessitates several days of labour from a crew of specialists using expensive gear, professionals can get a sense of the context in which this statement is made.

Equipment & Cameras

A good question to ask is what kind of camera and equipment will be used. Unless you have prior experience working with professional equipment, you can probably skip this information. When used by a professional, even a mediocre videographer, even a low-end camera can outperform the best equipment in the wrong hands.

The number of cameras being used is an important consideration. Single cameras can't capture everything reliably and safely. You can capture more and better shots without missing a thing by using two cameras. More safety and creative leeway can be had by leaving a 3rd camera on a stationary wide shot.

Final Versions & Editing

The editing process is crucial. The value of high-quality editing cannot be overstated. Try asking yourself:

  • Can you estimate how long it will take to finish?
  • Is it possible to get, say, the long cut and a 15-minute highlight video?
  • What will all of the titles, tags, and other designations be?
  • Does the DVD release come with a title list?
  • Will there be musical accompaniment? If this is the case, the digital rights situation warrants an explanation.

If money is tight, you may want to ask that the wedding be covered but uncut. If you don't have the funds to have the footage edited right away, you can always download it in its unprocessed "raw" form and watch it whenever you like. Capturing the moment is more important than perfecting it later in post-production. While videographers' reluctance to release raw footage is fairly standard, it never hurts to ask.

Check out our post on Which camera is best for wedding videography?

Video Format

Determine the video file type that will be used during production and distribution. HD wide-screen is recommended if available. When high-definition media is the norm rather than the exception and viewers spend all their time staring at their screens, standard-definition media will seem incredibly dated.

If you want the best quality, ask for the master tape or DVD in addition to the regular copies. A later time will allow you to go back to this video and make any necessary changes or convert it to a different format. Don't be surprised if the videographer acts surprised by your unusual request. Having this knowledge before the big day is ideal.

A videographer who can frame amazing scenes and effortlessly shift between wide-angle and close-up macro shots is essential if you want your video to be more than just a series of long, static shots panning around a single room.

  • Try to find wedding video vendors who let you alter the video package.
  • Examine the videographer's work samples and portfolio, paying attention to the picture and sound quality.
  • If the videographer has the personality to record the event without upsetting the guest, do so.
  • Find out what kind of camera equipment they are using and whether they offer HD (high definition) video.
  • Check to see if they can stick to your wedding budget without sacrificing quality.

Getting recommendations from friends and family is the best way to find a dependable videographer who produces work in the style you prefer. You might be given a list of contacts by your wedding photographer; some photographers may even include videography in their list of services. The Wedding & Event Videographers Association is another option (weva.com).

By first visiting a videographer's website, where you might be able to see sample reels, you can get an idea of their style. Consider it a sign that the videographer is not tech-savvy if they don't have a website or if it is poorly designed. Keep looking if that's the case!

The best way to determine the calibre of the final product is to request to see an example of an entire, edited tape from one wedding when you first meet with prospective videographers rather than a "best of" demo.

The editing of the raw footage to create an amazing sequence is a crucial component of the video service. Usually, video editing involves removing extra, unnecessary scenes. In an entirely new way, your wedding is turned into a narrative story. Your wedding event celebration will be more beautiful thanks to the union of innovative ideas, top-notch technology, and artistry. You might want to include a voice-over that is added during the post-production phase and enhances a memorable wedding ceremony in one's life with powerful music or special effects.

All wedding flowers eventually die, your wedding guests will eat the food on the menu, and the only things you will have for ever are the photos and the video taken during the celebration.

The "couture" option is to have your wedding photographed on motion picture film, such as 8 mm or 16 mm, which is the format used to shoot the majority of those lush, silky Hollywood productions (think: The Aviator). While a "film version" of your wedding day is as glamorous as it gets, it is also a luxury good; the cost of making one hour of this kind of film can be as much as $2,000 for the filmmaker. You must pay at least $3,000 for the filmmaker's time and talent in addition to the price of the actual movie. However, given how amazing and gorgeous these movies are, you might find the cost to be worthwhile.

Conclusion

An excellent way to preserve the memories of your wedding day is to have a video made of it. The excitement and happiness of your wedding day can only be fully captured in a video. DVDs offer better picture quality and can be kept for a century or more, so that's probably how your videos will be sent to you. Inquire to see a portfolio of their previous work shot in a similar setting to yours. Variety abounds when it comes to wedding films.

The preparations of the bride and groom may be the primary focus of some, while the dancing and revelry at the reception may take up a large portion of the focus of others. When you hire a videographer, you'll be dancing with them from the moment you sign the contract until long after the reception is over. The final photo's quality will be determined solely by your rapport with the photographer. The success of your film depends on the rapport you and your videographer are able to establish. A good videographer is someone who is personable and articulate in front of the camera.

It's important to set everyone's expectations for the day's events and the video in advance. You won't find any high-quality wedding videos on sale, not even on Black Friday. The question of what camera and equipment will be used is a pertinent one. It's crucial to think about how many cameras are being used. You can always download the raw footage if you don't have the money to pay for editing right away.

If you want extra copies, ask for the master tape or DVD. It's best if you know this stuff before the big day. You need a videographer with excellent scene framing skills if you want your video to be more than just a series of long, static shots circling the same room. There is no video service without the ability to edit videos. A voice-over could be added in post-production if you so choose.

One hour of this type of film can cost the filmmaker up to $2,000. But you may find the price justified when you see how incredible and beautiful these films are.

Content Summary

  • Although it may seem like a minor detail, having a video made of your wedding is a great way to remember the big day forever.
  • To ensure smooth running of the event, it's best to hire a photographer and videographer who have experience collaborating.
  • Find a filmmaker who is comfortable with your venue type.
  • Find someone who matches your wedding video style preference.
  • Having a videographer on board means dancing with them from the time you sign the contract until months after the wedding, when the editing is complete.
  • The quality of the photo you end up with depends entirely on how well you get along with the photographer.
  • When you and your videographer have a good rapport, you can share personal details that will make your film stand out.
  • Pick a person who will despatch two people on the day of the wedding.
  • A demonstration tape is a great way to see the videographer's work before hiring them.
  • A good question to ask is what kind of camera and equipment will be used.
  • Determine the video file type that will be used during production and distribution.
  • If you want the best quality, ask for the master tape or DVD in addition to the regular copies.
  • Examine the videographer's work samples and portfolio, paying attention to the picture and sound quality.
  • The editing of the raw footage to create an amazing sequence is a crucial component of the video service.
  • Usually, video editing involves removing extra, unnecessary scenes.
  • While a "film version" of your wedding day is as glamorous as it gets, it is also a luxury good; the cost of making one hour of this kind of film can be as much as $2,000 for the filmmaker.
  • You must pay at least $3,000 for the filmmaker's time and talent in addition to the price of the actual movie.

FAQs About Wedding Videographer

Photographers have it pretty sweet most of the time, shooting pretty and stunning images that they can sometimes instantly transfer directly to clients from their cameras. For videographers, the process is much more arduous and time-consuming.

If you can relive the day, hear the vows, toasts or speeches being said or see the expressions on people's faces, if you want to show your children your wedding one day on video, then yes, you should get a wedding video.

However, the average wedding video length is between three to five minutes for a highlights version or short film or up to 30 minutes or longer for a documentary or cinematic style. You can always opt for both, depending on what you'd like to use it for and what kind of wedding video packages are offered.

This fee grants the client access to the raw footage and permission to use it at their discretion. This is the big one. And it is mainly about protecting the rights of everyone involved. When you make a video, the production company will be very clear on what the video is for and where it will be displayed.

A Traditional videographer has a typical video camera that is usually shot continuously. There's less creativity involved besides documenting everything that's being done. There's no storytelling involved, and it doesn't give you those emotions you would get from a Cinematic Wedding.

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