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What Should a Wedding Video Include?

It's a lot of pressure to be in charge of shooting the wedding video. Planning the shots and making sure you have the correct gear shooting at the right resolution are the greatest ways to decrease stress and get all of the footage the couple needs.

You need to be at the appropriate spot at the right time, so it's best to ask around and get a sense of the schedule from the other attendees. Collaborate with them to create a shot list of essential moments, and carry it with you as you capture the wedding.

There is a lot you won't want to miss at your wedding. Video is an absolute requirement for capturing all the special moments of your wedding, from the proposal to the invites to the reception and the actual vows.

It's time to start filming once you've set up your gear and decided how you want to shoot. You and the wedding parties should not arrive at the ceremony location at the same moment, if you're the videographer. In order to go through the wedding schedule with the wedding coordinator or the officiating minister, you need get there early. A wedding's videographer is just as crucial as the reception's DJ.

The key points are the locations of the entrances for the bride and groom, the locations of the various seating arrangements, and the existence or absence of any out-of-the-ordinary events scheduled for the day. You'll be able to figure out where the cameras should be set up and when to be there to grab the finest shots with this data in hand. Take this piece of advice: carry the wedding programme with you at all times. Check out Vines of the Yarra Valley wedding venue for your ultimate wedding reception.

length of editing videos

Table of Contents

The Classic Style

You need to be at the appropriate spot at the right time, so it's best to ask around and get a sense of the schedule from the other attendees. Collaborate with them to create a shot list of essential moments, and carry it with you as you capture the wedding.

There is a lot you won't want to miss at your wedding. Video is an absolute requirement for capturing all the special moments of your wedding, from the proposal to the invites to the reception and the actual vows.

It's time to start filming once you've set up your gear and decided how you want to shoot. You and the wedding parties should not arrive at the ceremony location at the same moment, if you're the videographer. In order to go through the wedding schedule with the wedding coordinator or the officiating minister, you need get there early. A wedding's videographer is just as crucial as the reception's DJ.

The key points are the locations of the entrances for the bride and groom, the locations of the various seating arrangements, and the existence or absence of any out-of-the-ordinary events scheduled for the day. You'll be able to figure out where the cameras should be set up and when to be there to grab the finest shots with this data in hand. Take this piece of advice: carry the wedding programme with you at all times.

The Cinematic Style

Wedding videos shot in a "cinematic" style are now the standard. Getting dressed, the ceremony, bridal party photos, and the reception are all parts of the wedding day that most couples want to see in a highly polished "highlight reel." It's as if you were making a video that captured the day's mood rather than its actual events. And among those who use social media, this style of film is wildly popular. You could sell this to a couple who wants to tell their tale to the world and it would be the perfect bundle for them.

Need a Wedding Video Company for your special day? Look no further, Vines of the Yarra Valley have you covered.

This kind of video can be shot by oneself with little difficulty. Simply equip yourself with a high-quality DSLR or mirrorless camera, a stable gimbal, and sturdy arms, and you'll be ready to start shooting. If you want to get the best shots possible, you may have to orchestrate some of the action. Set the scene by having the couple sprint through a wheat field. Have them look wistfully into each other's eyes. Capture all of these high points at 60 to 120 frames per second so that you may slow them down in post. Personally, I enjoy shooting cinematic wedding videos because it allows me to put my own unique spin on things and really bring the ceremony and reception to life.

The finished product will look and feel very much like a highlight reel you might find on YouTube for a major event, complete with stunning imagery, stirring music, and panoramic drone shots. You can also experiment with colour grading in unique ways to convey the spirit of their special day.

The Blended Package

Capture the entire ceremony (although with just one camera) and utilise a second camera on a gimbal to get cinematic shots; this is a mashup of the traditional and cinematic wedding film styles. Shooting in a mixed approach is like providing oneself with a cushion for the edit. Even if some of your chosen highlights don't turn out, you can always fall back on the whole ceremony recording. This is especially crucial when trying to record a specific moment during the ceremony, such as the kiss. Just in case one of your cameras fails right before the big kiss, you're prepared with a spare.

The blended editing approach can also simplify the editing process. An abundance of material makes editing from a dual-camera setup more simpler than editing from a single camera. The raw footage of the ceremony might be sold to the couple for extra money.

Remember that you're aiming to give the couple their favourite video, not yours, as there are many ways to capture their special day. Injecting some of your own personality into the project is encouraged, but the client's wishes should always take precedence if they are footing the money. Always meet with them ahead of the wedding to go over their wishes and expectations. After soliciting their feedback (and presenting them with all of their choices), you'll be ready to go out and film some amazing footage.

Your camera should be focused on the door the bride and groom will use to enter the ceremony site well before the ceremony begins. You should position yourself behind the altar to capture clear images of the guests arriving. Make sure you get some good images of the flowers, decorations, and perhaps some of the crowd before the parties enter.

Take potshots at the happy couple as they enter the ceremony. Try not to follow everyone around with the camera unless they're doing something very interesting. Otherwise, stay put and snap medium images as people walk in and out of focus.

Create a trailer

Condensing the footage into a high impact 'trailer' that presents the highlights matched to an upbeat soundtrack is a terrific way to share your recollections with others who may not want to view the complete wedding movie. A growing trend among newlyweds is to distribute their trailer online and include a link to it in their thank you notes.

Proposal video

You're about to ask the big question, right? A video proposal is sure to leave them speechless. You can still use video to capture the event even if you decide against a video proposal. If you want to propose, have a friend or a photographer record the moment. Then you can announce your engagement with a slideshow or video recollection of the proposal.

Bridal party intros

Because your guests may not be familiar with everyone involved in your big day, it's a good idea to include a short video on your wedding website introducing them. It's also a lot easier than having the bridesmaids and groomsmen pen lengthy introductions to each other.

Bridal shower recap

Create a social media-ready video to both thank those who attended your wedding shower and provide a recap for those who couldn't make it.

Wedding invitation video

It's no surprise that video invitations are growing popularity. They may be used in a variety of ways, don't require any extra paper, and your wedding guests won't lose them!

blonde girl wearing white dress

Story of us video

You might wish to fill in your friends and family on the details of your relationship before the wedding. It's possible that far-flung family and long-lost friends from high school don't know each other or have a clear understanding of how you two met and fell in love. Your wedding website or Facebook group might benefit greatly from a video telling your narrative. It's also a great way to get the guests at your rehearsal dinner or engagement party in the mood to celebrate!

With so many Wedding Videographers out there it can be confusing to choose the right one.  Check out our top picks here.

Preparation Shots

Some photos can be taken candidly while the wedding party gets ready, but others, like the groom pinning on his boutonniere, will require some setup or good timing.

There is a sense of elation in the air. You are surrounded by your closest friends and family members as you carefully pin your hair back and do your cosmetics. Don't forget to record the speeches, laughter, and tears that occur just before the bride and groom exchange vows.

Remember that your groom and his guys have to get ready for the big day, too, even though you'll be spending the morning being dolled up.

Wedding favours

Sweet wedding favours or thank-you presents for the bridal party and groomsmen might be made in the form of videos. Make sure the cameraman is present when you and your future husband exchange gifts. In addition, if the package contains a love note, you should read it aloud so that the film's editors can incorporate your heartfelt comments in various scenes.

The Ceremony

The wedding ceremony is notoriously challenging to capture on film. If you can, bring a friend who can record from a different perspective. Having the camera pan from the groom's face to the bride's as she walks down the aisle is a classic example of this type of moving and intriguing film.

Your walk down the aisle should be recorded by one cameraman, while your groom's reaction to seeing you for the first time should be recorded by the other. Ask a relative to "discreetly" film the groom and have their footage included in the final cut if you can only afford one videographer.

Must-Have Wedding Shots

The final kiss at a wedding ceremony is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and just one kiss is allowed. There will be no second chance if you blow it. Your ability to capture these pivotal moments depends on how well you've planned for them.

Single-camera shoots don't allow for much supplemental material. Some of the rituals could be missed if the camera wasn't aimed at the main activity instead of the little nuances. Even with just one camera, you can get some fantastic shots, but you won't be able to capture quite as much detail.

In order to capture your entrance down the aisle and the entire ceremony, your videographer will need a nice location. The cameraman may need to move around to capture all of this.

wedding rings

Film guest messages

Be it the bride and groom, the parents, the grandparents, the officiant, or any other overly chatty guest, this is acceptable. A wedding trailer benefits significantly from the inclusion of interviews.

The notion of having guests record video greetings for your wedding video isn't new, but it does lend a special touch to the final product. To help your guests feel more at ease when recording their message, consider putting up a private video room with a couch and a stationary video camera.

The Reception

We're at the party's starting point now! During the reception, your videographer will primarily document the happenings of the night, with some dancing thrown in for good measure. Yet again, having a second videographer will allow for more up-close and detailed coverage of the event.

Use your videographer to their maximum potential. After the big events, they shouldn't just stand there with the camera on a tripod shooting the dancers; instead, they should move around the room a bit. Get them out on the dance floor, mingling with the guests, and filling them in on how the night is going so far from you and your new spouse.

There may likely be some background noise in the clip, but the focus should be on capturing the joyous and celebratory mood of the event rather than on getting technically perfect sound.

You obviously put quite a lot of time and effort into choosing the perfect colour scheme, linens, flower arrangements, and other decorative elements. Before your guests arrive, make sure your efforts are properly documented.

Guests should expect a casual atmosphere and plenty of photo ops during the reception. It is a good idea to scope out the venue for the reception ahead of time and plan where you would want to put your gear. Don't forget to record the bride and groom's entrance, the cake cutting, speeches, first dance, and bouquet toss. Don't forget to snap some close-ups of the event space, the guest book, the cake before it's cut, the place settings, the invites, and anything else that stands out or seems noteworthy.

The same goes for folks who are making a mess of themselves while eating. As soon as the video goes viral, everyone involved will be mortified to see themselves on screen, and your professionalism and integrity will be called into question.

Use a professional soundtrack

Although it may seem easy to set your wedding video footage to music, it can be challenging to find the right combination of visuals and sound. A skilled editor will ensure seamless transitions between scenes and that the music's tempo is appropriate for each segment of the video. Your creativity isn't only limited to music. The father of the bride's speech, along with a photo montage of the bride getting dressed, is guaranteed to get at least one tear shed.

The Unexpected

Although you may have a list of images you want to take, you should still be open to taking advantage of impromptu moments that capture the spirit of the day. Guests should listen for the ring bearer and flower girl to start having fun. Get that stolen kiss, the unplanned (or planned) group dance, or the proud tears of a parent on film. The wedding movie benefits greatly from include these touching speeches and toasts.

Keep in mind that the wedding day is the most significant day of the couple's lives. The professional sphere requires both deference and competence from its participants. Constantly push yourself to improve, and focus all of your energy, time, and attention on taking the greatest possible pictures. The happy couple will have a wedding video they will cherish forever, and you can take pride in knowing you played a role in making their special day so memorable.

FAQs About Wedding Video

However, the average wedding video length is somewhere between three to five minutes for a highlights version or short film, or up to 30 minutes or longer for a documentary or cinematic style. You can always opt for both, depending on what you'd like to use it for and what kind of wedding video packages are offered.

Media its a turn around time of 4-8 weeks and that is above average on other Wedding Videography companies. The average is 8-12 weeks. Hi Louisa, Every videographer is different and the time to get your wedding video can depend on how busy they are.

Keep in mind that typically around 30-40 hours will go into editing your wedding film! Wedding videography is a huge, detailed, and time-consuming process.

Video coverage means you'll get to relive some of your favorite wedding moments, whether it's the vows you exchanged, your dad's speech, or the first look. And the best part is you'll be able to share these moments with your friends and family again and again.

Traditional Wedding Photography and Videography, basically documents the entire events in a traditional or straight angle. It's more about the staged group shots or posed shots. Traditional Photography is something opposite to the candid wedding photography.

Conclusion

Planning the shots and making sure you have the correct gear are the greatest ways to decrease stress. Having a video of your wedding is crucial if you want to remember all the wonderful details. Carve out where the cameras should be set up and when to be there to grab the finest shots. Shot in a "cinematic" style, wedding videos have become the norm. The key points are the locations of the entrances for the bride and groom.

Capture all of these high points at 60 to 120 frames per second so that you may slow them down in post. The Blended Package combines elements from both classic and modern cinematic approaches to the wedding film. Use a gimbaled second camera to get overhead shots of the entire ceremony in addition to the one you use to record the event. The couple may be able to make some extra money by purchasing the raw footage of the ceremony. There has been a recent uptick in the number of newlyweds who promote their wedding with a trailer and send out links to the trailer in their thank-you cards.

Some photos can be taken candidly while the wedding party gets ready, but others, like the groom pinning on his boutonniere, require some setup or good timing. Filming a wedding ceremony is notoriously difficult. Don't forget to record the speeches, laughter, and tears that occur just before the bride and groom exchange vows. Involve a family member in "discreetly" filming the groom so their footage can be included in the final cut. Having a second videographer will allow for more up-close and detailed coverage of the event.

After the big events, they shouldn't just stand there with the camera on a tripod shooting the dancers. Bring them out to the disco and fill them in on the night's happenings as they dance. Finding the right visuals and audio for a wedding video can be difficult. A competent editor will make sure the scenes flow naturally into one another and that the music is set to the right pace. The father of the bride's speech and photo montage are guaranteed to get at least one tear shed.

Content Summary

  • It's a lot of pressure to be in charge of shooting the wedding video.
  • As the videographer, you and the wedding party shouldn't arrive at the same time.
  • In order to go through the wedding schedule with the wedding coordinator or the officiating minister, you need to get there early.
  • Take this piece of advice: carry the wedding programme with you at all times.
  • It's time to start filming once you've set up your gear and decided how you want to shoot.
  • You and the wedding parties should not arrive at the ceremony location at the same moment, if you're the videographer.
  • In order to go through the wedding schedule with the wedding coordinator or the officiating minister, you need to get there early.
  • Wedding videos shot in a "cinematic" style are now the standard.
  • Shooting in a mixed approach is like providing oneself with a cushion for the edit.
  • The blended editing approach can also simplify the editing process.
  • The raw footage of the ceremony might be sold to the couple for extra money.
  • Condensing the footage into a high impact 'trailer' that presents the highlights to an upbeat soundtrack is a great way to share your memories with others who may not want to watch the full wedding movie.
  • You can still use video to capture the event even if you decide against a video proposal.
  • If you want to propose, have a friend or a photographer record the moment.
  • Then you can announce your engagement with a slideshow or video recollection of the proposal.
  • Wedding invitation videoIt's no surprise that video invitations are growing popularity.
  • It's also a great way to get the guests at your rehearsal dinner or engagement party in the mood to celebrate!
  • With so many Wedding Videographers out there it can be confusing to choose the right one.
  • Don't forget to record the speeches, laughter, and tears that occur just before the bride and groom exchange vows.
  • The wedding ceremony is notoriously challenging to capture on film.
  • The final kiss at a wedding ceremony is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and just one kiss is allowed.
  • In order to capture your entrance down the aisle and the entire ceremony, your videographer will need a nice location.
  • Help your guests feel more at ease when recording their message, consider putting up a private video room with a couch and a stationary video camera.
  • During the reception, your videographer will primarily document the happenings of the night, with some dancing thrown in for good measure.
  • Yet again, having a second videographer will allow for more up-close and detailed coverage of the event.
  • Use your videographer to their maximum potential.
  • Although it may seem easy to set your wedding video footage to music, it can be challenging to find the right combination of visuals and sound.
  • A skilled editor will ensure seamless transitions between scenes and that the music's tempo is appropriate for each segment of the video.
  • Your creativity isn't only limited to music.
  • Although you may have a list of images you want to take, you should still be open to taking advantage of impromptu moments that capture the spirit of the day.
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