what should not be included in a wedding invitation (2)

What Should Not Be Included in a Wedding Invitation?

Choosing the words to use on your invitation is a very important step in the wedding planning process. We've all seen enough wedding invitations to know what's expected. While it may seem trivial, the wedding invitation is the guest's first glimpse into the festivities to come.

How official shall we make this? Casual or strictly following the rules? Is there anything you know you shouldn't include on an invitation? Looking for a Wedding Event Planner? Look no further, Vines of the Yarra Valley have you covered.

Table of Contents

What to Exclude From Your Wedding Invitation

what should not be included in a wedding invitation

There are some items that, for reasons of tact or simple aesthetics, you might want to leave out of wedding invites. A handful of them will be examined in this article.

Registry Information

  • Wedding registry information is the number one thing you should not include in invitations.
  • You're undoubtedly eager to tell everyone about the wonderful registry you've built, so this is a challenging question.
  • Gifts and registries should not be mentioned on the wedding invitation, per wedding registry etiquette rules.
  • Sharing this information via word of mouth or a wedding website is recommended. If it's necessary to include it, you can do so by printing it on an insert card and slipping it into the invitation envelope.
  • In addition, you need to make sure your guests have a good idea of what to get you if they decide to bring you a present.
  • However, it is still considered quite impolite to provide information about a gift registry on a wedding invitation.
  • Because no matter how you put it, it sounds like you simply want to shower your visitors with presents.
  • Including the registry details on the wedding website and including a little insert with the website address in the invitations is a common practise today. This is a problem that has been resolved.

No Kids

  • While there is no definitive solution to the question of whether or not to invite children to a wedding, we do recommend that you avoid saying "Any children" or "Adults only" on the invitation itself and instead find another way to convey your wishes.
  • The inner envelopes need just have the name of the individual invited on them, so that attendees know without a doubt who has been invited and who has not.
  • The "Number attending" section of the answer card can be completed in advance, and all the visitor needs to do is sign their name next to "accepts" or "regrets." As a result, you can set your own limit on the overall number of attendees.
  • You might also have a parent or close family friend call the families who listed children on the answer card and politely explain that the event is for adults only.
  • It's sweet that you want your wedding to be an adult-only event, but if you print "no kids permitted" or something similar, it can be a bit of a bummer for your mum friends who are attending.
  • Don't use such abrasive language; instead, address the invitation to the guests of honour.
  • Are you worried that they will bring their kids along anyway? You can utilise your mother, your prospective mother-in-law, and your wedding party to respectfully spread the word that your wedding will be for adults only.
  • In addition, don't forget to mention it on your wedding website!

Pre- or Post-Wedding Events

Don't use the wedding invitation to announce any parties before or after the wedding. Rehearsal dinner details might be shared verbally or via invitations.

Too Much Information

  • You can compare your wedding invitation to a 30-second commercial. Its purpose is to give guests a quick and clear overview of your wedding day, including the essentials like who is getting married, when, and where.
  • More than that, and it becomes more likely that something will be forgotten. Even worse, instead of simple and beautiful, your invitation will look busy and cluttered.
  • Please only add information that is necessary for the guests to attend the wedding.
  • Don't worry, though; you can still let people know about the rest of the celebrations you're throwing (like on your wedding website)!

Too Many Different Fonts and Font Sizes

  • Avoid utilising a wide range of fonts and sizes in your invitations to keep everything looking clean and simple and readable.
  • Keep things simple by having no more than two of anything.
  • It's acceptable to use a third, smaller font size if you'll be providing a single sentence describing the reception at the bottom of your invitation, such as "dance to follow."
  • Create a dramatic impression by handwriting your names in a typeface that stands out from the rest of your invitation.

The Bride's Married Name

  • If you're planning to adopt your spouse's surname immediately after the wedding, you're definitely eager to get started.
  • Unfortunately, your married name is one of the many things we advise against including in wedding invites, so you won't have a good place to start.
  • When sending out invitations, use your maiden name if you haven't already legally changed your name to your husband's last name.
  • The only time this wouldn't apply is if you've already tied the knot (either at a remote location or at a courthouse) and are inviting people to a ceremony or reception to celebrate your marriage.
  • Then it is appropriate to refer to yourself by your married surname. Or, how about this: On the invitation, just use your first and middle names and your spouse's, of course.

Alcohol Information

  • Noting on the invitation that "Wine and Beer Only" or "Alcohol-Free" will suffice.
  • Guests' attendance at your wedding will not hinge on this information because you are not sending out invitations to a cocktail reception.
  • You can put this details on your reception cards if you need to.

An Incomplete Address/location

  • Guests should be able to find your wedding and reception with ease and on time thanks to the information you include in your invitations.
  • Make sure the address you provide on the invitation is correct before sending them out for final printing.
  • How particular is it? Do you know if the address is specific enough for guests to use a GPS device?
  • Even while this seems obvious, don't underestimate its significance!
  • You wouldn't want your guests to show up at the wrong location, such as the rectory instead of the church or the country club office instead of the reception hall.
  • You should not be evasive about a location's exact address if you plan on including it; rather, you should include the full address.

Wedding Invitation Etiquette Mistakes to Avoid

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  • Inviting guests to your wedding requires more than just dropping a card in the mail.
  • To make sure your invitations are perfect in every way, we asked our experts to weigh in on the most common invitation etiquette faux pas and offer their advice.

Putting an Incorrect Start Time

  • You should probably resist the urge to put an earlier start time on the ceremony invitations than the one you've actually set.
  • Attendees of a wedding know one thing for sure: they need to get there early.
  • Guests should arrive between 4:30 and 4:45 if the ceremony is scheduled to start at 5 p.m., and the bride and groom should go down the aisle no later than 5:15.
  • Guests will arrive closer to 4:00 if they know the ceremony starts at 4:45, meaning they'll have to wait an extra hour to see your big entrance.

Not Including All the Necessary Information

  • One of the keys to guest satisfaction is keeping them in the know. Include all relevant information on your wedding invitations, including the date, time, and place of the ceremony.
  • For those who don't want their guests to travel anyplace else, simply write "reception to follow" on their invitations.
  • You can either provide the reception's location on the invitation or, more officially, print a reception card that specifies the time and location.
  • Include details about pre- and post-wedding events, the location of the hotel, and the wedding website on your information card. Also, remember the required attire!

Sending Them Too Late

  • To determine the time frame, take a look at your wedding date and subtract eight weeks (for a non-destination wedding). This is the absolute latest day that invitations should be mailed in order to allow for a response and travel arrangements to be made by the recipients.
  • When you get married, will it be at a specific location or will it be somewhere else? Allow your guests ample time to plan their trip and find the best deal possible by counting back 12 weeks.

Not Providing Rsvp Instructions

  • This is a significant one, so make sure your RSVP cards provide a deadline by which guests must respond. Provide your invitees with at least three weeks' notice to RSVP for the event.
  • To give your caterer plenty of time to plan, set the RSVP date at least two weeks before the event.
  • Plus, make sure everyone knows how to respond. Include a self-addressed envelope for them to respond in, or point them in the direction of the RSVP email, phone number, or website.

Not Putting a Stamp on the Rsvp Envelope

  • Make sure the envelope is pre-addressed and has postage on it if you want your visitors to mail back an RSVP card.
  • Do you need to go out and buy a tonne of extra stamps because of this? Yes. However, it is impolite to make your guests shell out money (even for a single stamp) in order to respond to your invitation.

Including Your Registry Information

  • Not including your registration details on the invitation is a no-brainer, but it doesn't mean you should totally disregard the idea.
  • Put the link to your website (not the registry itself) on a separate insert. Then, clearly label the register section of your site so that visitors may quickly and easily access it.

Not Clarifying Who Is Invited

  • The most important part of the envelope is the list of names. Never say "The Smith Family" if you're only inviting the parents.
  • Instead, you should write "Mr. and Mrs. John Smith," implying that they are the only guests.
  • Write "and Guest" or the guest's name if you know it if you're inviting them along with someone else.
  • Is it a family affair? Both "The Smith Family" and "Mr. & Mrs. John Smith, Susie, Alex, & Michael" would work, with the children's names on the line below those of their parents.

Dos and Don'ts of Wedding Invitations

what should not be included in a wedding invitation (3)

  • Our best advice on personalising, addressing, and mailing out your invitation cards is below.
  • If you're planning on sending out invitations to this event, we hope you'll find these suggestions helpful.

Dos for Wedding Invitation

Do Use the Same Wording

All of your wedding stationery should use the same formal wedding invitation text (response card, reception card, invitation, etc.).

Do List the Bride's Name First

The bride's name is expected to be listed first on the invitation as per social convention. You can, of course, break this rule if you want to, but tradition is wonderful to have around sometimes.

Do Choose Invitation Colors That Match Your Wedding Colors.

If the design isn't available in your colours, the wording on most wedding invitations can be customised to fit your specific colour choices. 

Do Include the Children

For blended family ceremonies, we highly encourage using wedding invitation wording that incorporates the children. 

Do Be Different

There are so many invitation styles to choose from, and you don't have to settle for an invitation that's anything like the last five invitations you've received.

Do Use Online RSVPs

An online RSVP service is perfectly acceptable. If you're worried about the older generation, you can include a phone number for them to call. Also, feel free to use both response cards and an online RSVP service.

Do Include Directions

You can include map cards with your invitations or offer directions on your wedding website. Either way, your guests will appreciate the added effort.

Do Allow Others to Address Your Invitations

This will save you a tonne of time and hassle whether you choose to use envelope addressing service when ordering wedding invitations or employ a calligrapher for that beautiful, individualised look.

Do Be Consistent in Recording Responses

The response cards can be easily misplaced if left out on a counter or coffee table, so be prepared to record the results right away or store them somewhere secure.

Do Keep an Invitation as a Souvenir

Bride and groom often forget to keep a copy of the invitation for themselves. Fortunately, a family member or a friend is always willing to give one up but keeping one aside in good condition is best for keepsakes.

Don'ts for Wedding Invitation

Don't Mention Registry Info

You can also include the registry information on the wedding invitation or response card. Word of mouth is another viable means of disseminating this data.

Don't List "no Children" on the Invitation

Include the recipient's name on the envelopes. Guests will know who to expect to attend the wedding after reading this. The response cards can also be designed using "limited-seats" language.

Don't Use More Than Two Fonts

We recommend using one script font as an accent lettering style and one block font as your main lettering style. This will ensure that your wedding details are readable.

Don't Mention Before and After Wedding Events

The wedding invitation should not include information on the rehearsal or the honeymoon. Rehearsal dinner details might be shared verbally or via invitations. Include a separate info card with your invitation for events that take place the day after, such as breakfasts and gift openings.

Don't Forget to Verify Addresses in Google Maps

We are all well aware that mobile devices' GPS systems are not perfect. Therefore, you should double-check all addresses with Google Maps and MapQuest to ensure accuracy. If not, you should include map cards in your wedding invitation package.

Don't Fail to Stamp the Response Cards

It's just good manners to stamp the reply cards for your guests. Because it's less of a hassle for people to respond, you'll get more of them and they'll respond faster.

Don't Miss to Include Food Options

It's not uncommon for partners to forget to mark their dinner preferences on the response cards. If you want to have a plated lunch at your reception, for instance, the caterer will need to know how many people will be attending. This language is unnecessary if the dinner is being served in a buffet style.

Don't Set The Rsvp Date Too Close to the Wedding Date

At the very least, plan on having three weeks between the RSVP deadline and the wedding date to follow up with those who don't answer, finalise the guest list, and make a seating chart (if needed).

Don’t Be Unclear Over Who’s Invited

  • Ensure the names of all of your wedding guests are printed on the inside of the invitation envelopes. If you don't want to include an inside envelope with your invitation, then just write the final headcount on the reply cards.
  • Customers should tell each other, "Section xx, seat xx, reserved for you," when ordering.

Don't Skip Ordering Extra Invitations and Envelopes

More invites and envelopes should be ordered than you initially anticipate needing. It's likely that you'll forget some guests and make a few typos when addressing the invitations' envelopes. Buying in bulk is much more cost-effective than starting from scratch.

Conclusion

The wedding invitation serves as the recipient's first taste of the upcoming celebration. Tact and aesthetics suggest omitting details on the couple's wedding registry. According to wedding registry etiquette, neither gifts nor registries should be mentioned on the invitation. Don't forget to mention the wedding's date, time, and location on the invites. Give them at least three weeks to respond to their invitations.

Make sure they know where to find the RSVP email or phone number, or provide them with a self-addressed envelope. What to do and what not to do when sending out wedding invitations, including suggestions for wording, addressing, and mailing. Traditional wedding invitations have the bride's name at the top. Wording for wedding invitations that includes the kids is highly recommended for mixed-family ceremonies. Write the name of the receiver clearly on each envelope.

Type in one script font for emphasis and one block font for the body copy. Verify that addresses are correct using both Google Maps and MapQuest. Put some map cards in with the wedding invites. In order to show your visitors that you appreciate their time and effort, it is courteous to postmark their response cards. Extra invitations and envelopes should be ordered.

FAQs About Wedding Invitation?

It's best to send your wedding invitations around 4-5 months before your big day. It's expected that not everyone will RSVP (especially not on time) and sending your invitations too early may cause people to misplace your invite or simply, forget.

A good rule of thumb is to call the wedding for at least half an hour to 45 minutes before you want the ceremony to begin, and state that time on your invitation.

If you're inviting a married couple, put their names on the same line. You're free to forgo titles and list the names separately (as shown below in example two). If they have different last names, list the person you're closest with first. If you're equally close with them, go in alphabetical order.

The average cost of wedding invitations sits between $400 and $650 for most couples. This pricing can change drastically based on several different factors. Amount of invited guests, wedding theme or design, and materials sourcing are the major things that add up to give you your final price tag.

Formal attire is definitely defined as a full-length gown, very fancy cocktail attire from dresses to a really glamorous pantsuit. When it comes to the men, formal wedding attire means a tuxedo. And definitely, a bow tie, which I love! The only time a tuxedo is not required is when it's black-tie optional.

CONTENT SUMMARY

  • Choosing the words to use on your invitation is a very important step in the wedding planning process.
  • Gifts and registries should not be mentioned on the wedding invitation, per wedding registry etiquette rules.
  • You can utilise your mother, your prospective mother-in-law, and your wedding party to respectfully spread the word that your wedding will be for adults only.
  • Create a dramatic impression by handwriting your names in a typeface that stands out from the rest of your invitation.
  • Make sure the address you provide on the invitation is correct before sending them out for final printing.
  • To make sure your invitations are perfect in every way, we asked our experts to weigh in on the most common invitation etiquette faux pas and offer their advice.
  • Include all relevant information on your wedding invitations, including the date, time, and place of the ceremony.
  • Provide your invitees with at least three weeks' notice to RSVP for the event.
  • The most important part of the envelope is the list of names.
  • Both "The Smith Family" and "Mr. & Mrs. John Smith, Susie, Alex, & Michael" would work, with the children's names on the line below those of their parents.
  • Bride and groom often forget to keep a copy of the invitation for themselves.
  • You can also include the registry information on the wedding invitation or response card.
  • This will ensure that your wedding details are readable.
  • If not, you should include map cards in your wedding invitation package.
  • It's just good manners to stamp the reply cards for your guests.
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