Unplugged Wedding

Why Should You Consider an Unplugged Wedding Ceremony?

One of the newest trends isn't a shade of wedding garb or flavour of wedding cake, but rather a regulation of the best man's house: no Snapchatting during the ceremony! It's becoming increasingly common for couples to forgo include smartphones and social media like Instagram in their carefully orchestrated nuptials.

The choice of whether or not to have a wedding that is free of technology is not one that can be applied universally. How much camera flashes you can endure before losing your cool and throwing the personalized toast flutes at Aunt JoAnn depends on your family's traditions, the type of wedding you envision, and your own sense of style.

In this day of social media and smartphones equipped with sophisticated cameras, everyone wants to freeze those priceless moments forever. Before you can even say "I do,” you've already been tagged in a wedding photo on Facebook and Instagram.

Take a look at our long selection of Melbourne wedding photographers to find the perfect one for your big day. Unplugged weddings, in which guests are asked to leave their electronic devices at home, are gaining popularity.

Looking for a Wedding Event Planner? Look no further, Vines of the Yarra Valley have you covered.

Table of Contents

So, what exactly is an Unplugged Wedding?

A wedding that is "unplugged" is one in which no electronic devices such as cell phones, cameras, iPads, or videos are used.

You politely request that your visitors refrain from using any electronic devices, including cameras, during the service and the rest of the day. Only your photographer or filmmaker can get this shot, so give them the freedom to do their thing.

The Point of Going Unplugged

Everyone you care about is invited to your wedding so they can share in your joy and watch as you tie the knot with the person who has meant the most to you in life. You wish your loved ones could share in this moment with you, and you long to glance back down the aisle and see their beaming faces and happy tears.

You wouldn't want to turn around and see people hiding behind their phones and cameras as they snap shots of you walking down the aisle.

Below are some examples of why you would want a tech-free ceremony. The photographer at your wedding will no doubt do their best to avoid taking any photos that have too many people staring at their phones.

Several couples today are opting to have their weddings streamed live online, and there are many advantages to doing so. The benefits and drawbacks of having an unplugged wedding have been laid out for your perusal.

The door to the public has now been closed on this exchange. Even though most of your guests are busy snapping photos to post on Instagram, you still invited those people because you desired to share this special occasion with them, right?

You probably didn't think highly enough of that person to invite them to partake in the experience if you didn't ask them. Just because your relative decides to post it doesn't mean everyone else has to see it on social media. It's only fair that you get a voice in when and how your wedding photos are shared online.

That can sound forceful and unpleasant, but it has nothing to do with prohibiting people from using cellphones. This is more of an effort to raise awareness among your guests. Take a break from what you're doing and just be present for them throughout the ceremony.

The topic is narrowed down to weddings, but I think many people would be able to relate and so learn to put down their phones more often.

  • Provide as much detail as possible. You can specify that no photos should be uploaded to social networking sites like Facebook or Instagram. Make sure your attendees know the rules if you don't want any cell phone use at your event, including calls, texts, and photos.
  • Guests' phones shouldn't be taken away as soon as they arrive.
  • Be sure your invitees understand your preferences in advance. If you choose not to include this information on your wedding invitations or website, be sure to inform your guests in other ways, such as through extensive signage and an announcement by the officiant. Here's the rest of the information your visitors will need in advance.
  • Don't have to have a plugged-in connection. The desire for a technology-free ceremony is perfectly reasonable and comprehensible, but it becomes excessive when extended to the reception. In addition, using a hashtag for your wedding is a great way to get your guests involved in the celebration.
  • Don't forget to reassure your guests that you will send them high-quality copies of your wedding album.

Vines of the Yarra Valley is your ultimate Wedding Reception Venue to create your dream wedding. 

Justifications to go unplugged on the big day

It's been going on for years, and it's all about making amends. A place where people may love, laugh, and be themselves without fear of judgment. And if we're being honest, they're essential to our enjoyment of life.

However, it might be healthy to reconnect with loved ones at a wedding by putting down phones, tablets, and cameras for the duration of the ceremony.

As soon as a photo is taken, it is uploaded to Facebook and an Insta story is created showing you walking down the aisle. Before that guest could even say "congratulations to you," all of this would have already taken place.

You can lessen the likelihood of this happening by opting for a technology-free ceremony, but you might also consider waiting to share any wedding images online. This is obviously only one perspective.

It's great that you can look back at these pictures on social media the next day and feel like you were right back there. It's polite to request that guests wait until the day following the wedding before posting photos to social media.

Request that your visitors stop taking photos on their phones and tagged everyone in them and instead spend the day having fun with you. You can create your own hashtag, like #thesmiths2020, to track all the pictures people contribute under a specific topic. If you have your guests use this hashtag on social media, you may view all of their pictures in a single place.

The “presence”

Your fiance and his/her family carefully picked each and every guest to share in this momentous occasion. You want to see people's faces, not their phones, when you make your final walk down the aisle as Miss or walk up the aisle as Mr.

With everyone's phones and tablets put away, you can force people to actually talk to each other and have fun at your party. In addition, it will guarantee that your company is present for the event.

This also frequently occurs during performances. How often have you been capturing your favourite song at a show before realising that you were witnessing everything through your 4-inch screen when your famous singer was standing right in front of you singing your favourite song LIVE?

Similarly, if guests at your wedding are not allowed to use their phones, they will be more present in the moment and more receptive to the love that you and your fiance are exuding.

The Noise

Sounds like a mouse clicking, an alarm going off, and a bell ringing. This may all happen at your wedding and take attention away from you, the bride. Remember the one guest whose ring tone goes off during your vows because they forgot to silence their phone.

This does in fact occur. Some people never learn to put their phones on mute. Do you really want mechanical chimes to disrupt the most meaningful and touching moment of your life?

Why Unplug Your Wedding

Obstructed views

Nobody likes getting a glimpse of you via smartphone camera. Or even worse, not even see you. Picture yourself making your way down the aisle towards your waiting spouse. Your great aunt suddenly enters the aisle, obscuring your view of your fiance while she takes shots with her phone.

You look around and notice that everyone is pointing their cameras in your direction, and instead of focusing on your soon-to-be spouse's radiant grin, you're blinded by the flashes.

You make your photographer look bad by accident.

You've decided to hire a pro to record your special day. Professional photographers are obligated to acquire the shots you commissioned them for, even if that means politely asking a well-intentioned uncle to step aside.

Lost Opportunities

All of your guests will be standing in the aisle with their phones out to catch the perfect image of your first kiss when you get your proofs back. When cameras obscure people's faces, it's impossible to tell if they were wiping away tears or smiling at an amusing gaffe.

After making this decision, how will you explain it to your guests and convince them to put down their phones and tablets?

Tips for Informing Your Visitors.

  • You can have your Officiant or Event Planner address the guests before the procession begins. That manner, no one will be able to "miss" your signs or your programme notification. Even better, he or she can read a message you've written yourself. It's also a good idea to include it on your wedding website and invitations.
  • There are a few options for letting people know that your wedding will be "unplugged," either only during the ceremony or all day long.
  • Put it on the invitation: Tell them in advance by including a note in the invitation itself or on the wedding website that reads something like, "We would love for you to be there, but we have an unplugged wedding, so absolutely no photos during the ceremony."
  • Signage at a wedding could advise visitors to turn off their phones and refrain from taking pictures during the service. Please assure them that you will be sharing photographs taken at the wedding.
  • If your event requires an order of service, you may want to add a sentence at the beginning of this to inform guests once again.
  • Ask the best man or registrar to make a quick announcement requesting attendees to silence their phones and refrain from taking any images.
  • Make sure your guests know that they will have access to the photographer's work. They should just be there to share in the occasion with you and not worry about snapping photos. You didn't ask them to snap pictures, and you didn't ask them to document the event in any way other than by sharing in the joy and excitement with you.

Vines of the Yarra Valley is your perfect wedding venue in Melbourne delivering fairytale weddings for the bride and groom.

Benefits and Drawbacks of an Unplugged Wedding

Benefits:

You seem to be leaning towards a world without social media, where no one takes photos, and where no one uses technology to steal the show. If you're having doubts about your decision, perhaps these advantages will reassure you that you've made the proper one.

Manage your feelings of being left out.

When planning an event with a limited number of guests, or even a bigger one with manageable restrictions, it's common to engage in some back-and-forth with respect to who gets invited. Someone who couldn't get a seat at your unplugged wedding can just forget about it until you decide how the event will be recounted.

Acting in a Professional Manor.

If your best buddy happens to walk into the shot while holding an iPhone, it will require your photographer to take the picture from a different perspective, which is the last thing anyone wants.

Peace During the Blessing.

There's no point in turning on a camera phone if there aren't any photos to take. There will be less pauses in the music. You can bet that Uncle Jack will get a call, and that he will still not know how to turn off the ringer in 2018.

Zero-Beat Ambience.

Have you ever watched a movie with someone who tweeted throughout the entire experience?

If you've picked your wedding venue because of its ambience—say, the groom's childhood church lighted only by candles or a secluded grove of trees at your mutual favourite winery—the light from guests' cell phones may detract from the look you painstakingly intended from the beginning of the planning process.

If this is the case, making a technological-free decision on the day of your wedding is a reflection of your refined aesthetic.

A blight on the eyes.

In addition to that, the glaring light is not the only problem. It doesn't matter how dim the room is; if a guest sticks their phone in the path to shoot their personal ceremony shot, they are quite likely to obstruct the eyesight of somebody who came to hear you utter your vows.

Hello, and welcome.

If you are trying to bring together members of your extended family for the first time or merely want to create a spirit of vibrant conversation, creating an atmosphere in which activity on social media appears to be encouraged may keep wallflowers against the wall.

Although we may all relate to the need to check our feeds rather than walk up to a stranger and introduce ourselves, it's crucial to consider how the activities you suggest to your visitors will affect the vibe of the party as a whole.

Maintain Concentration.

You may not receive as much focus on your elaborate photo booth if the matron of honour shows up with her selfie stick. You can keep your guests' attention on the activities you've arranged for them if you turn off all electronic devices.

They make a good photo op.

Can you really trust your family to choose a photo for the cover of the Facebook wedding album that you'll like if you don't get a say in the matter?

Maybe it would be humorous if you accidentally got a picture of yourself drinking Manischewitz or of you and your spouse making silly expressions while cutting the cake. However, timing its release is key to making it more humorous. Think about what you would do if a horrible photo suddenly become everyone's favourite as a pair.

Unplugged Wedding 1

Brawbacks:

The use of technology at weddings isn't for everyone, but if you and your partner are on the fence about it, here are some alternatives to think about. There are definitely some drawbacks that should be taken into consideration.

Unavailable guests.

People who are sick or live too far away to attend your wedding ceremony might appreciate live-tweeting or receiving the photobooth photos as they are taken.

Regard for other cultures.

If one of the newlyweds comes from a family or culture in which paying attention to aesthetic features is a crucial part of adequately celebrating a marriage, then prohibiting photography during the wedding may cause more problems than it solves.

And yet, it's 100% you.

If you and your spouse aren't concerned about the images being professionally edited or having optimal lighting, you and your spouse may want to consider crowd-sourcing your wedding photos by allowing friends to take pictures throughout the ceremony and reception.

Flip the Angles.

Unfortunately, you won't be able to keep tabs on every detail of your big day.

Your guests can show you their side of the reception by posting Instagrams of funny or touching moments, and this could provide you some insight into what they appreciated most about the party you spent so much time planning. By cutting power, you cut off the reason for a happy face in the morning.

The Secret to Success

Regardless of your final decision, it is essential that you express your preference for it to be recognized. After you and your partner have discussed whether or not to have a tech-free wedding day, you can let your wedding party and guests learn what you've decided by following these steps.

In Case of Doubt, Consult the Vendors.

Your photographer will appreciate your lowtech approach. Our photographer has asked that no further photographs be taken, and I'm sure they'll relish the opportunity to play the role of villain. 

Say it again.

You should make this abundantly apparent, whether you're planning a social media take-over for your wedding or going completely tech-free. It is not excessive to make a proclamation on the back of the programme and to have a sign at the guestbook. 

Do Not Be Shy; Spread the Word.

Guests' urge to record and talk about your wedding day is the source of all its potential irritations in the modern information age. Keep that need for closeness in mind, whatever you end up doing.

Conclusion

Unplugged weddings, in which guests are requested to leave their personal devices at home, are becoming increasingly common. A wedding is considered to be "unplugged" if no electronic devices, including cell phones, cameras, iPads, or videos, are used throughout the ceremony.

Have a look at our extensive list of wedding photographers in Melbourne to locate the professional who will best capture your special day.

You have the option to instruct social networking sites like Facebook and Instagram not to save any images on their servers. If you do not want any of your participants to use their cell phones while attending your event, make sure they are aware of the regulations.

The use of a hashtag during your wedding is an excellent approach to encourage participation from your guests in the festivities. It's possible that putting down your phone, iPad, and camera at a wedding could be beneficial to your ability to reconnect with loved ones.

Make it known that you would appreciate it if your guests would refrain from shooting pictures with their mobile devices and instead spend the day having fun with you. The guests at your wedding will be more present in the moment if they are prohibited from using their cellphones during the festivities.

Some people never learn to put their phones on vibrate or mute when they are in the presence of others, such as at a wedding.

Photographers are expected to get the photos you commissioned them for, even if it means politely asking a well-intentioned uncle to step aside in order to get the shot they need. There are a few different ways in which you can let people know that your wedding will be "unplugged."

Request that the registrar or the best man make a brief announcement asking guests to mute their phones before the event begins. Make sure that your guests are aware that the photographer's work will be available to them to view after the event.

Your photographer will need to shoot the picture from a different angle if your best friend walks into the frame while carrying an iPhone. This is because your friend will obscure the view of the subject.

Your wedding venue's atmosphere could be ruined by the glow of guests' cell phones, which would be a terrible choice. In the event that the guest of honour shows up with her selfie stick, your sophisticated photo booth might not garner as much attention as you had hoped.

If you turn off all of the electronic devices at your party, your attendees will be more likely to focus on the activities you've planned for them. If you and your spouse are on the fence about whether or not to include technology at your wedding, here are some alternatives to consider.

The use of technology at weddings is not for everyone. The use of crowdsourcing, live-tweeting, or receiving photographs from a photobooth as they are taken are all potential alternatives.

Content Summary

  • The choice of whether or not to have a wedding that is free of technology is not one that can be applied universally.
  • Unplugged weddings, in which guests are asked to leave their electronic devices at home, are gaining popularity.
  • A wedding that is "unplugged" is one in which no electronic devices such as cell phones, cameras, iPads, or videos are used.
  • It's only fair that you get a voice in when and how your wedding photos are shared online.
  • Be sure your invitees understand your preferences in advance.
  • In addition, using a hashtag for your wedding is a great way to get your guests involved in the celebration.
  • However, it might be healthy to reconnect with loved ones at a wedding by putting down phones, tablets, and cameras for the duration of the ceremony.
  • You can lessen the likelihood of this happening by opting for a technology-free ceremony, but you might also consider waiting to share any wedding images online.
  • It's polite to request that guests wait until the day following the wedding before posting photos to social media.
  • If you have your guests use this hashtag on social media, you may view all of their pictures in a single place.
  • This may all happen at your wedding and take attention away from you, the bride.
  • All of your guests will be standing in the aisle with their phones out to catch the perfect image of your first kiss when you get your proofs back.
  • Tell them in advance by including a note in the invitation itself or on the wedding website that reads something like, "We would love for you to be there, but we have an unplugged wedding, so absolutely no photos during the ceremony.
  • Please assure them that you will be sharing photographs taken at the wedding.
  • Ask the best man or registrar to make a quick announcement requesting attendees to silence their phones and refrain from taking any images.
  • Make sure your guests know that they will have access to the photographer's work.
  • If you are trying to bring together members of your extended family for the first time or merely want to create a spirit of vibrant conversation, creating an atmosphere in which activity on social media appears to be encouraged may keep wallflowers against the wall.
  • You can keep your guests' attention on the activities you've arranged for them if you turn off all electronic devices.
  • The use of technology at weddings isn't for everyone, but if you and your partner are on the fence about it, here are some alternatives to think about.
  • Regardless of your final decision, it is essential that you express your preference for it to be recognized.
  • After you and your partner have discussed whether or not to have a tech-free wedding day, you can let your wedding party and guests learn what you've decided by following these steps.
  • Your photographer will appreciate your lowtech approach.
  • You should make this abundantly apparent, whether you're planning a social media take-over for your wedding or going completely tech-free.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

But at your wedding ceremony and reception, there's no need to carry your phone-the only thing you should be carrying around with you is your bouquet! It's also impractical unless you plan to carry a purse on your wedding day, which many brides don't do.
 
The couple respectfully requests that all guests honor the sanctity of this moment by turning off cell phones and cameras. Emotional: I invite you to be truly present at this special time. Please, turn off your cell phones and put down your cameras.
Some couples choose to still be introduced as Mr. and Mrs. Groom's Last Name, since the bride may go by her husband's name socially.
“We're so glad you're here! Please stow away your phones and cameras until the reception. We promise to share the beautiful pictures taken today.” “Please honour our wishes with no photos until we're announced as Mr and Mrs!”
It goes without saying that you should put away your cell phone during the wedding ceremony. Not only is it a huge distraction, but it's also going to make you miss out on a very important event in a friend or family member's life.
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